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  • A Q&A with Dr David Sack on the History of Oral Cholera Vaccine (Part 1 of 3)

    Dr. Sack Faculty Headshot, Photo: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

    Dr. Sack Faculty Headshot, Photo: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

    Oral cholera vaccine (OCV) can decrease the severity of a cholera outbreak, reduce rates of disease in endemic settings, and prevent cholera during humanitarian crises and emergencies. Listen to the conversation or read the transcripts below to hear Dr. David Sack, M.D., the Director of the Delivering Oral Vaccine Effectively (DOVE) project and professor of International Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, discuss the history of OCV and the potential for a single dose vaccine.

  • Expanding Access to the Oral Cholera Vaccine

    Members of the Malawi field team who visited pregnant women monthly to check on status of pregnancy and encourage them to go for pre-natal visits

    Members of the Malawi field team who visited pregnant women monthly to check on status of pregnancy and encourage them to go for pre-natal visits

    This post originally appeared on Johns Hopkins' The Globe.

    A new study by a team of Hopkins faculty and students led by Dr. Mohammad Ali, a senior scientist in International Health, found significant evidence that the oral killed whole-cell cholera vaccine is safe to administer during pregnancy.

    Cholera affects about 2.5 million people a year, and, if untreated, the disease can be fatal in a matter of hours. As a result, around 100,000 people—overwhelmingly the world’s most vulnerable—die every year because they have no access to care (1). Among pregnant women, cholera can increase the risk of miscarriage and stillbirth by up to 36 percent. Yet, pregnant women have largely been excluded from vaccination campaigns because little evidence has been available to confirm that it is safe for fetuses (2) —leaving both the women and their pregnancies less protected from the disease. 

  • How Valid is a Case Fatality Rate (CFR) When Monitoring Cholera Care?

    David A. Sack, MD

    Professor | Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
    Cholera Outbreak in Sierra Leone, Photo: Caroline Thomas, MSF, 2012

    Cholera Outbreak in Sierra Leone, Photo: Caroline Thomas, MSF, 2012

    This post originally appeared on the CORE Group M&E Working Group list serv.

    Many serious diseases report a case fatality rate (CFR) to illustrate the severity of the infection or to monitor the effectiveness of treatment. However, when examining a CFR, one may need to dig a bit deeper to understand how the rate is determined.  As with any rate, the CFR is calculated from a numerator and a denominator.  Generally, the denominator is the number of people with the disease who are diagnosed as having the disease, often counted at the hospital or clinic. The numerator is the number of people, among those who are diagnosed, who die:

  • This World Immunization Week, Learn Why Oral Cholera Vaccine is Vital in Saving Lives

    This World Immunization Week, the DOVE Project wanted to share why the oral cholera vaccine is so vital to saving lives around the world. We put together an infographic that illustrates what OCV is, when it should be used, and how it is being used globally. For easy promotion on social media, please visit us on Twitter @STOPCholera

  • Reflections on an Oral Cholera Vaccine Campaign in War-Torn South Sudan

    Ella Glass, RN

    Health Manager - Emergency Response Team, South Sudan | Medair
    A child receives oral cholera vaccine in South Sudan. Photo: Ella Glass, Courtesy of Medair (2017)

    A child receives oral cholera vaccine in South Sudan. Photo: Ella Glass, Courtesy of Medair (2017)

    Ella Glass reflects on her experience conducting a mass cholera vaccination campaign alongside a World Food Programme headcount in a difficult-to-access area in South Sudan.

    At dawn on the headcount day, as the teams crossed the vast field carrying supplies for the day ahead, the sun was just rising on the horizon. It was a beautiful large orange glowing ball, casting out a soft golden glow as far as my eye could see. Women we had hired to carry items were walking in front of me, effortlessly balancing 20kg boxes of vaccines and tables on their heads as they walked barefoot across the dusty, scorched earth. Looking up from the ground, in front of us were thousands upon thousands of men, women, and children, having camped out overnight to be earlier in the queues. It was really quite astonishing. The overwhelming incredible needs of this population were staring me right in the face and I could feel a small lump at the back of my throat.