Team Bios

David A. Sack, MD, the director of the DOVE project, is a professor in the Department of International Health at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and has spent his career devoted to the control of infectious diarrheal diseases like cholera, rotavirus, and diarrhea due to enterotoxigenic E. coli. He obtained his medical degree from Oregon Health and Sciences University and trained in internal medicine at the University of Iowa and in infectious diseases at Johns Hopkins University. During his career, he spent 15 years in Bangladesh conducting research at the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh, (icddr,b) including 8 years as its executive director. While at the icddr,b he accepted the first Gates Award for Global Health on behalf of the Centre in 2001. In addition to directing the DOVE project, he is also head of the Enteric Laboratory at the Johns Hopkins University Center for Immunization Research, which carries out clinical trials of new enteric vaccines. He has authored more than 300 articles and serves on advisory committees for the National Institutes of Health, the World Health Organization, the International Vaccine Institute, and the Program for Appropriate Technology in Health (PATH).

Peggy Adamo, BS, is the Administrative Coordinator for the DOVE project as well as various other studies  within the department of International Health at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Peggy obtained her BS from Johns Hopkins University and is now in the process of acquiring her Master’s degree in Research Administration. Peggy has been with JHBSPH off and on for over 14 years.

Mohammad Ali, PhD, is a senior scientist in the Department of International Health at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. He introduced geographic information systems in vaccine evaluation studies, and his newest spatial epidemiology studies investigate the herd effect as well as the effectiveness of cholera vaccines. Dr. Ali is the author or co-author of nearly 125 publications, a reviewer of several peer-reviewed journals, an adjunct professor at Seoul National University, and a research consultant at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Andrew Azman, PhD, is a Research Associate in infectious disease epidemiology at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. His primary interests include understanding the role of the environment in disease transmission and the role of vaccination in response to enteric pathogens. Andrew’s current research focuses on exploring the spatio-temporal dynamics of cholera transmission in areas with seasonal transmission (e.g., Bangladesh) and those with outbreaks re-occurring on much longer time scales (e.g., Guinea Bissau). He also works on a number of projects related to optimal use of oral cholera vaccine (OCV) and new methods to study the overall impact (direct and indirect effects) of OCV in reactive vaccination campaigns.

Anne Ballard, MPH, is a Program Officer II for the DOVE project at the Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs (CCP). Anne leads knowledge management, advocacy and communication initiatives on the use of oral cholera vaccine for the DOVE project, including the StopCholera.org website. She holds a Master of Public Health in global health communication from The George Washington University.

Amanda Debes, PhD, MS, is an Assistant Scientist in the Department of International Health at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Her primary interests include the development and validation of diagnostics for use in low resource settings. Her research focus is on the assessment of sustainable tools for disease detection and the molecular characterization of cholera to improve understanding of transmission processes and facilitate intervention strategies. Dr. Debes completed her PhD in global disease epidemiology and control and her MS in biotechnology at Johns Hopkins. Previously, she worked as a research scientist and project manager for the Department of Defense’s Cooperative Biological Engagement Program conducting clinical research projects throughout the former Soviet Union

Jacqueline Deen, MD, trained in pediatrics at the University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, and in pediatric infectious diseases at the University of California Medical Center, Los Angeles. She obtained a master's degree in public health in developing countries at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. She has worked as a clinical researcher at the Medical Research Council in The Gambia, as a consultant for the World Health Organization, and as a scientist at the International Vaccine Institute in Seoul, Korea. She has extensive experience in Asian and African countries in cholera surveillance and in diagnostic studies and effectiveness trials of the oral cholera vaccine.

Anna Lena Lopez, MD, obtained her medical degree from the University of the Philippines and trained in pediatrics and pediatric infectious diseases at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, the Children's Hospital, Los Angeles, and the University of California Medical Center, Los Angeles. She obtained her master's in public health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. She coordinated the Cholera Vaccine Program at the International Vaccine Institute, in Seoul, Korea, including clinical trials that led to the licensure of the low-cost oral cholera vaccine in India (Shanchol) and WHO prequalification. She has extensive field experience in cholera surveillance and vaccine trials and is currently a research associate professor at the Institute of Child Health and Human Development at the University of the Philippines Manila–National Institutes of Health.

Moise Ngwa,Msc, MPH, PhD, Assistant Scientist with the DOVE-Project, is a faculty member in the Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Moise obtained his Bachelor’s degree in Health Economics at the University of Yaoundé II, Cameroon and Master of Science in Logistics and Supply Chain Management from the Technical University of Berlin, Germany. Subsequently, he obtained his Master of Public Health with focus on health policy management and Ph.D in Public Health with focus on environmental and global health from the University of Florida. In his career, he spent 4 years studying the internationalization of services at the Technical University of Berlin, Germany, which include comparing the health systems and insurance policies of Cameroon and Germany. He also spent 5 years conducting research at the Emerging Pathogens Institute (EPI) at the University of Florida on cholera in Haiti and Cameroon. While at EPI, he obtained his first NAID grant to study cholera environmental determinants in Cameroon. Moise has authored more than 8 publications.

Malathi Ram, PhD, is an Assistant Scientist in the Global Disease Epidemiology and Control Program in the Department of International Health of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. She has worked on several international collaborative research studies in India, Ghana, Peru, Guatemala, South Africa, Brazil, and Bangladesh, with over 25 years of experience in all aspects of data management, such as developing study instruments, developing and updating standard operating procedures, developing data entry screens, developing error-detection programs, ensuring data quality, training onsite study personnel in data management activities in compliance with GCP guidelines, and performing data analyses.

Mellisa Roskosky, MSPH, is a PhD student in the Department of International Health at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Her primary interests include methods in global cholera surveillance and control. Her research focus is on cholera epidemiology and oral cholera vaccine delivery strategies in Nepal. Mellisa completed her MSPH in global disease epidemiology and control Johns Hopkins in 2012 focusing on HIV related kidney disease in South Africa. Prior to returning to Hopkins, she worked as a project manager for the Geneva Foundation managing orthopedic clinical trials and related trauma research.

Christina Shaw, BBA, is a Communications Specialist at the Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs (CCP). Christina supports knowledge management activities on the DOVE Project including the StopCholera.org website, blog, social media, and the StopCholera toolkit. She holds a Bachelor of Business Administration with a concentration in Marketing from the Fox School of Business at Temple University and is currently pursuing a Master of Geographic Information Systems from Penn State University.

Lorenz von Seidlein, MD, was born in Germany and attended medical school in Dublin, Ireland. He completed a pediatric residency in Miami, an infectious disease fellowship at the University of California, Los Angeles, and a PhD in epidemiology from the London School of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. From 2000 through 2010, Lorenz worked with the International Vaccine Institute in Seoul, Korea, where he managed several large vaccine projects, including mass vaccination campaigns using oral cholera vaccine in Mozambique and Zanzibar. Beginning in 2003, Lorenz worked with the Mahidol-Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit in Bangkok, Thailand, on a large multi-center trial to compare the efficacy of parenteral artesunate with parenteral quinine for severe malaria. Beginning in 2006, Lorenz coordinated a trial of the malaria vaccine candidate RTS,S/ASO1 in Tanzania. He is currently coordinator of the Asia Pacific Malaria Elimination Network (APMEN) Vivax Working Group at the Menzies School of Health Research in Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia.